Tag results for: Yukon

Robert Service at his desk

Discovering the literature and poetry of a country we’re visiting: for me this is one of the greatest pleasures of travel. And what a thrill when it happens in your own country like it did in the Yukon this summer. Read more

At the intersection of the Dempster Highway and Latitude 65 N

“And we should call it Latitude 65,” Magellan said five years ago when he floated the idea of a blog about our travels, the black-sky rains of November pelting our windows on the forty-ninth parallel in Vancouver.

What places, I’ve always wondered, are on the circle of latitude 65° N of the Earth’s equatorial plane?

And if we were nearby, how would we know the exact spot?

“We’ll be at latitude 65 this morning,” said Magellan as we left Yukon’s Tombstone Territorial Park where we’d camped the night before on our driving trip up to Tuktoyaktak.

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Orchid Acres. That’s an oxymoron isn’t it? “Orchid” and “Acres” are two words that just don’t belong together.

Where in the world do you find acres of orchids? You’re lucky to see a single, wild orchid in an acre of tropical rainforest.

Except, except for Orchid Acres, in West Dawson, Yukon, off Sunnydale Road on the Top of the World Highway, overlooking Dawson City.

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In mid-June, I drove from Latitude 49 near the American border to Latitude 69 at Tuktoyaktuk on the Beaufort Sea, rescuing Spice along the way from the miners at Dawson City.

Connecting the dots on the 9200 km return trip to Tuktoyaktuk revealed a set of spectacles. The natural spectacles and our impressions from the people we met gave us a whole new view of the North and its people. Read more

It was Ruth Ann’s idea for our annual holiday. “I want to go to Dawson City,” she said, quite firmly.

We settled on meeting there on June 7 and staying four nights. A few days after we reserved our Air North flights, Magellan said he was going to drive up, meet me on June 11 and then he and I were going to drive up to Tuktoyaktak. The elders shall have their way—and I’m grateful to them both.

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